What does Apple want with Beats?

In the nineties, Apple was falling apart. Steve Jobs was gone, and the company seemed distracted. Instead of focusing on computers and operating systems, Apple branched out. It built new printers and a camera, called the QuickTake, that couldn’t zoom or focus. This seemed like an attempt to disguise the lack of innovation in its main business. In fact, the new products only added clutter and chaos.

After Apple acquired Jobs’s company NeXT, at the end of 1996, Jobs and his hardware chief, Jon Rubinstein, worked rapidly to restore order. One of their first moves was to kill the division that had built the printers and cameras.

Read more here.

 

The Job After Steve Jobs: Tim Cook and Apple

Shortly after Tim Cook succeeded Steve Jobs as CEO of Apple in August 2011, he told a confidant that he got up every morning reminding himself just to do the right thing—and not to think about what Steve would have done.

But Jobs's ghost loomed everywhere after he died from pancreatic cancer two months later. Obituaries of Apple's visionary founder blanketed the front pages of newspapers and websites. TV stations ran lengthy segments glorifying the changes he brought to the world.

Read more here

Why Is Apple Being So Nostalgic

A few weeks ago, Apple’s longtime ad creator Lee Clow suggestively tweeted, “Gonna be a good Super Bowl. Mac’s gonna be 30 :).” People immediately started speculating that the iPhone and iPad maker might air an ad celebrating the Macintosh computer’s birthday. Any fans waiting for an Apple ad on Sunday night were disappointed. On Monday morning, however, the company released an online video that may have been what Clow was hinting at... 

But, as beautifully as the video depicted how the company’s products have changed the world, it was also another reminder of how much Apple has changed since those days—not least because the old Apple, under Jobs, looked forward, not backward. “I think if you do something and it turns out pretty good, then you should go do something else wonderful, not dwell on it for too long,” he had famously said. “Just figure out what’s next.”

Read more here.

Is Apple's E-book Fight Worth The Trouble?

In early September, after Denise Cote, a federal judge in New York, found Apple liable for conspiring to fix the prices of digital books, she appointed a watchman to make sure the company complied with antitrust laws...

“Apple has been given several opportunities to demonstrate to this Court that it has taken the lessons of this litigation seriously,” Judge Cote said when she ordered the external monitor. “I am disappointed to say that it has not taken advantage of those opportunities.”

Since then, the company has only proven her point. 

Read More on NewYorker.com

Apple vs Samsung, A Patent Battle Without an End (In Japanese)

アップルとサムスンの争いは小説にでもなるかのような幾多のドラマを生み出してきた。アップルがサムスンを訴えたのは2011年4月。サムスンがアップルの革新的な技術や傑出したユーザーインターフェース、エレガントで卓越した商品やパッケージデザインを卑屈なまでに模倣していると主張したのだ。サムスンは即座に反訴した。両社は供給関係――サムスンはアップルにプロセッサやメモリーチップを供給――にあるため、外見上はていねいな態度を装っていただけではなく、そちらの関係を崩さないよう、両社が気をつけていた。しかし、1年以内に、2社が相手を10ヵ国16の裁判所で50件以上も訴訟を起こしたことで、とげとげしさが全面戦争にエスカレートしていった。

Steven Paul Jobs, 1955-2011

During his more than three-decade career, Mr. Jobs transformed Silicon Valley as he helped turn the once-sleepy expanse of fruit orchards into the technology industry's innovation center. In addition to laying the groundwork for the industry alongside others like Microsoft Corp. MSFT -0.27% co-founder Bill Gates, Mr. Jobs proved the appeal of well-designed products over the power of technology itself and transformed the way people interact with technology.

"The world rarely sees someone who has had the profound impact Steve has had, the effects of which will be felt for many generations to come," Mr. Gates said in a statement Wednesday. 

Read more on WSJ

 

Your Apps Are Watching You

Few devices know more personal details about people than the smartphones in their pockets: phone numbers, current location, often the owner's real name—even a unique ID number that can never be changed or turned off.

These phones don't keep secrets. They are sharing this personal data widely and regularly, a Wall Street Journal investigation has found.

Read more on WSJ

Jobs, Back at Apple, Focuses on New Tablet

Just a few months after Steve Jobs had a liver transplant, the Apple Inc. chief executive is once again managing even the smallest details of his company's products, this time focused on a new tablet device.

Since his return in late June, the 54-year-old has been pouring almost all of his attention into a new touch-screen gadget.

Read more here

 

Jobs Had Liver Transplant

Steve Jobs, who has been on medical leave from Apple Inc. since January to treat an undisclosed medical condition, received a liver transplant in Tennessee about two months ago. The chief executive has been recovering well and is expected to return to work on schedule later this month, though he may work part-time initially.

Read more on WSJ

Howard Stringer, Japanese CEO

Howard Stringer is annoyed. Since becoming Sony Corp.'s first foreign chief executive almost two years ago, he has been slammed by Japanese financial analysts and Sony employees for being disconnected from the company's daily operations, especially during two big crises. Investors in the U.S., meanwhile, have put him under constant pressure to fix Sony's problems more quickly. 

Read more on WSJ